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wheelchair access for shops

Dan Smith and Andy Robinson in Exeter


Disabled adults are aiming to help make shops in Exeter more accessible.

It is part of an initiative called Purple Tuesday which hopes to improve shopping experiences for disabled people.


People who receive support from Community Equality Disability Action (CEDA) will provide advice on what changes might need to be made.

Dan Smith, who uses a wheelchair, said: "I won't buy from a shop if I can't get all the way around it."

ACCESS SHOPS
Dan Smith, who uses a wheelchair, said: "I won't buy from a shop if I can't get all the way around it"


The 24-year-old added: "It's not a choice to be in the chair, I'm in the chair and that's how it is. It's the same way everyone else can go everywhere and be fine, we should be treated the same way."


Support worker Andy Robinson, from Woodbury, said one of the biggest issues was "inconsistencies".


The 49-year-old said: "One of the big things is the inconsistencies from establishment to establishment.


"We'll think of going somewhere and it's whether they have a ramp, does it work, is it too steep? Lifts, sometimes they work, sometimes they don't, and that's a massive problem."

An PA
Support worker Andy Robinson said one of the biggest issues was "inconsistencies"

Councillor Martin Pearce, the lead for communities and homelessness prevention, said: "It's fantastic CEDA are going out into the community and using their lived experience to help inform businesses to make shopping in the city for disabled people more accessible more of the time."


Craig Bowden, CEDA, said: "By working with city centre businesses to improve access and attitudes, we're hoping to make Exeter more welcoming for disabled people."

 

From BBC

 

 

 

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