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Imogen with her family
People using wheelchairs can also access the ice rink and chaperones do not have to pay to enter
 
An ice-skating experience says it is one of the first in the country to offer sensory skating.

The Gateway Centre in South Cerney is hosting the Gateway Ice Arena from 18 November to 3 January.

Every Monday sessions will take place with reduced lighting, no music and fewer skaters on the ice.

Skater Emily said her son Dougie "had the best time of his life. If there were more people he would really struggle".

Emily and her son Dougie
Emily said Dougie would struggle if there were more people at the rink

The rink also offers full wheelchair access and anyone requiring a chaperone can bring them along at no extra cost.

The owner of the ice rink, Rob Goves, said he wanted to make sure everyone was welcome at the rink.

"With around 700,000 people on the autism spectrum in the UK it is important that we try and include everyone," he said.

Rob Goves, owner of the ice rink
Rob Goves says he is proud to offer the sensory sessions

Imogen has Osteoperosis and came to the rink with her mum Wendy, dad Alex and sister Caitlin.

Wendy said: "It's been really great because it is us as a family doing something which is so inclusive. We have all had a great time."

"She has been loving it," Alex added. "Although she cannot see, she gets the noises, she gets the vibration through the ice."

Jodie with her mum Kerry and sister Emily

Loud noises could trigger a seizure for Jodie so her mum was pleased to find the quieter sessions

Jodie has cerebral palsy and came with her mum Kerry and sister Emily.

"It is really difficult to find somewhere fun and she wants to do fun things," Kerry said.

"It is just lovely that they have got a setup for children who cannot cope with such loud noises.

"She has epilepsy so loud noises can trigger a seizure so it needs to be safe for her as well as fun."

From BBC

 

 

 

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