Volunteers are trying to help more than 60 disabled Ukrainian children evacuated to an orphanage in Poland.

When taken to safety, the displaced youngsters had to leave behind sensory equipment which helped with development and entertainment.

Fundraiser Lee Ellerker, from Hull, said their plight was "heartbreaking".

He added: "When you see them just lying there staring at the ceiling and they haven't got anything at all, it literally does touch your heart."

The children were found by volunteers who had been delivering aid in the northern Polish city of Torun.

Mr Ellerker, who has been fundraising with the Hull 4 Ukraine group since the start of the war, said another four trucks of general supplies were nearly ready to make their way to those in need.

However, once the group received enough specialist donations, he would return to the orphanage to help create a sensory stimulation room, he said.

Katerina, who currently cares for the children at the orphanage, said most of the youngsters needed round-the-clock care.

"Feeding, changing diapers, washing, just staying with them, you know," she said.

She and Mr Ellerker said sensory equipment would have a "massive impact on the quality of the children's lives".

"The [Ukrainian refugee] story has dropped off the radar a bit I think," he said.

"But these children are now.

"Having more sensory equipment is essential to them, it would affect their lives very positively."

Mr Ellerker is appealing for help with ferry crossings, fuel, food and toys as well as medical and sensory equipment for the orphanage.